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Now Available: ProQuest Government Documents Collections

Several new ProQuest Government Documents resources are now available:

ProQuest Legislative Insightis a Federal legislative history service that makes available thoroughly researched compilations of digital full text publications created by Congress during the process leading up to the enactment of U.S. Public Laws. The following document types may be included in a legislative history:  bills, reports, documents, hearings CRS reports, committee prints, Congressional Record sections, Presidential Signing Statements, and Statutes.

ProQuest Indian Claims Insight is a one-of-a-kind research tool that provides researchers with the opportunity to understand and analyze Native American migration and resettlement throughout U.S. history, as well as U.S. Government Indian removal policies and subsequent actions to address Native American claims. Content includes decisions, transcripts, docket books, journals of the Indian Claims Commission, a judicial panel for relations between the U.S. Government and Native American tribes; and related statutes and congressional publications.

Published annually by the federal government since 1878, The Statistical Abstract of the United States is a comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States. ProQuest provides a fully indexed and highly-interactive platform to view every annual edition of this important resource.

ProQuest Congressional is a comprehensive online collection of primary source congressional publications and legislative research materials covering all topics, including government, current events, politics, economics, business, science and technology, international relations, social issues, finance, insurance, and medicine. Finding aid for congressional hearings (published and unpublished), committee prints, committee reports and documents from 1824-present, and the daily Congressional Record from 1985-present. Compiled legislative histories from 1969-present. Full text access to the U.S. Statutes at Large, which is the official compilation of all public and private laws and resolutions passed by Congress, listed in order by date of enactment from 1789-present.

Within ProQuest Congressional, there are several distinct resources:

ProQuest Congressional: Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings, debates, and activities of Congress. Although the Record contains a substantially verbatim account of the proceedings and debate, it also contains extensive inserted materials, communications from the President and executive agencies, memorials, and petitions.

 ProQuest Congressional: Congressional Research Service is a comprehensive full text collection of primary source U.S. congressional committee prints (1817-present) and Congressional Research Service reports (1916-2010) covering all aspects of U.S. politics and culture, including economics, business, science and technology, international relations, social issues, finance, insurance, and medicine.

ProQuest Congressional: Executive Orders and Presidential Proclamations Since 1789, U.S. Presidents have exercised authority through orders, proclamations, directives, memoranda, pardons, correspondence, statements, and other types of communication. As part of the U.S three-branch system of checks and balances, Presidents have undertaken actions to direct foreign policy, interpret enacted law, impact the enforcement of laws, and further social change. This unique collection offers over 100,000 examples of executive actions from 1789-2017.

ProQuest Congressional: U.S. Bills and Resolutions offers one place to go for the full text of all versions of U.S. public and private bills and resolutions implemented 1789-2013.

ProQuest Congressional: Executive Branch Documents contains documents (1789-1948) produced by Federal government departments, agencies, and commissions, spanning the years from our nation’s founding through the mid-20th century.  These documents touch upon all aspects of U.S. social, political, and economic life, as well as major events in U.S. history, and provide points of comparison between the U.S, and selected foreign countries.

Note: ProQuest expects to finish loading the 1940-1948 portion of the collection by the end of 2020. Click here for the latest reports on their progress.

ProQuest Congressional: Hearings (Published) is a comprehensive full text collection of primary source U.S. congressional hearings covering all aspects of U.S. politics and culture, including economics, business, science and technology, international relations, social issues, finance, insurance, and medicine.

The ProQuest Congressional: Hearings (Unpublished) libguide provides guidance for exploring unpublished hearings in ProQuest Congressional. Many hearings are not printed. The law does not require publication, and each committee or subcommittee decides whether to publish a particular hearing. Rules dictate when unpublished hearings are released from the National Archives. Senate hearings are usually released after 20 years; House hearings after 30 years. The exception is hearings that include classified or sensitive material; they can be held for up to 50 years.

ProQuest Congressional: U.S. Serial Set is a collection of primary source U.S. government publications compiled under directive of the Congress. It contains comprehensive and often detailed information on an extremely wide range of subjects, including economics, business, science and technology, international relations, social issues, finance, insurance, and medicine.

ProQuest Congressional: Serial Set Maps collection contains more than 70,000 maps printed as part of the Congressional Serial Set.  With the High-Resolution Maps Module, more than 50 percent of these are scanned at high resolution enabling users to see and download the smallest details on the map. The rest of the maps are mostly outline maps and would not benefit from being scanned at high resolution. Several Executive Branch agencies are the most prolific publishers of the maps including the Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Geological Survey.

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