“Accounting for Ecosystems in a Post-DDT Age”

Post contributed by Manasi Vyas, SCARC Student Assistant

Leah Aronowsky, Resident Scholar

Leah Aronowsky, Resident Scholar

Leah Aronowsky is a PhD candidate in the history of science at Harvard University who served a term as resident scholar in SCARC this past August. Her dissertation focuses on the concept of steady-state stability in the postwar American environmental sciences.

At SCARC, Leah examined efforts in the 1970s to develop ecosystem screening, advance the field of ecotoxicology, and introduce the meaning of environmental risk in the post-pesticide age. A particular focus of her work was DDT, a pesticide with detrimental consequences that can extend to an entire ecosystem. In particular, DDT has a tendency to persist in the body of organisms for long periods of time, eventually working its way up the food chain with deleterious outcomes.

In the 1950s, the use of DDT – which was embraced by farmers – underwent a five-fold increase. By the early 1970s, the negative effects of DDT had become more pervasive, forcing researchers to contend with this growing environmental threat. As they did so, scholars also began to highlight the need to construct a new method of evaluating chemical hazards, such as a screening system, that would reveal the relationship between a pesticide and an entire ecosystem.

The ecological microcosm is a mode of thinking that emerged from the post-DDT age. In this context, a microcosm is a small scale ecosystem that comprises different flora and fauna, and that contains a set of processes that can be intrinsic to all ecosystems everywhere. It is a lab-based tool that researchers believed would empower them to amplify chemical and biological processes, with potential applications in screening tests for the effects of pesticide use.

In the late 1970s, the Environmental Protection Agency was established to monitor air and water quality at a national level. In its early years, the EPA depended rather heavily on two pieces of legislation passed by Congress: the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act and the Substitute Chemical Program. During this period, DDT was banned and four regional EPA labs were tasked with addressing the pesticide problem. Researchers at each of these labs identified the microcosm as a vital method for detecting substitute chemicals and they set out to develop a standardized model that could establish a balance between the pesticide industry and the EPA.

One of the four EPA labs was based in Corvallis and was charged with administering the Substitute Chemicals Program. One of the Corvallis-based scientists, James Gillett, developed a microcosm ecosystem module for pesticide testing. About a year into the program, Gillett’s team ran several trials with this microcosm to make sure that each element functioned properly before initiating any pesticide screenings. They quickly ran into a problem with voles that had been built into the microcosm and which brought a degree of unpredictability that was unacceptable in terms of experimentation. (The team finally concluded that nature refuses to be simulated.) Ultimately, the Substitute Chemicals Program at Corvallis proved to be short-lived. Although researchers identified possible substitutes for a variety of banned pesticides, many of the substitute chemicals themselves were also in consideration to be banned by the EPA.

James Gillett

James Gillett

Although enthusiasm for the microcosm faltered, it was later reinvigorated by new legislation that required the testing of chemical product safety in terms of its effects on both human health and the environment. This, along with increased EPA funding, led new researchers to begin innovating with the microcosm. For instance, instead of constructing microcosms from scratch, the Soil Core Microcosm consisted of materials harvested directly from the field and focusing on a single area of an ecosystem. This new form of the microcosm was endorsed by the EPA and continues to be explored today.

Looking back, the early, general form of the microcosm was plagued by failure in both detecting chemical effects and as a pesticide screening device. The lab and field exist on a spectrum, and the microcosm, which is a hybrid of the two, is stuck in the middle, meaning that the significance of place is lost in the device. In its failure, the microcosm demonstrated that there is something intrinsically valuable to specificity and scale in ecosystems.

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Newly Processed Collection: USDA Northwest Cannery Survey Collection, 1914-1915

Post contributed by Rachel Lilley, SCARC Public Services Assistant

MSS Cannery_Eugene plant labels and Outline 9 and 10_Box 1 Folder 7_Page_1

In 1911, the 26th legislative assembly created the office of the Oregon State Immigration Agent, appropriating $20,000 for immigration advertising work, and an additional $5,000 for statistical research and collection work to be done by the Oregon Statistical Bureau (OSB). John Andrew Bexell, Dean of Oregon Agricultural College’s Department of Commerce, was chosen to direct the work of the OSB, and little surprise. In 1913, as part of an effort by the National Department of Agriculture (NDA) to develop a program of “moveable agricultural schools” to “further the scientific education of adults with very little scholastic learning,” the Office of Experiment Stations had tapped Bexell to develop a course on bookkeeping (The Barometer, May 30, 1913). Bexell’s course would include: a series of fifteen to twenty-five lectures, with accompanying readings and questions; a set of practicums or exercises; a complete list of equipment, materials, and published reference works needed to “properly present the subject;” and a list of pedagogical methods that would serve as suggestions for the teacher of the course.

Under Bexell’s direction, the initial mandate of the Oregon Statistical Bureau was the completion of a general survey of statewide agricultural operations in order to “determine the opportunities in each locality for new settlers and, if possible, to find some of the difficulties in agricultural development.” Though the OSB was not funded to continue its work after completing the survey, the resulting publication, The Oregon Farmer: What He has Accomplished in Every Part of the State, not only set a precedent for subsequent agricultural surveys, but provided the groundwork for the standardization of cannery operations in the state.

Each survey in the USDA Northwest Cannery Survey Collection (MSS Cannery) is comprised of between one and fourteen “outlines,” or reports, and each outline presents the same information for each cannery. Some of the more significant are Outline 1, and Outlines 9 and 10, which deal with cannery and association history, and each cannery’s labor force, respectively. Outline 1 typically includes information about the establishment of the growers’ association and a list of its founders; a cannery plant floorplan, and inventory of machinery; and lists of the types of product canned per season, how much product was canned, and the cost per can. Of special significance, however, are Outlines 9 and 10. These two outlines, often presented together as one report, not only document the use of female labor in canneries, but illustrate just how heavily canneries relied on female workers, and the types of work women did.

MSS Cannery_Corvallis plant Outline 3, plant map and procedures_Box 1 Folder 4_Page_1

A typical cannery season lasted a little over four months. On average, the surveyed canneries employed between thirteen and forty-eight women, with most hiring more women during the peak of the season. The Eugene cannery, for example, hired on as many as a hundred additional female workers during the height of the season. Female cannery workers filled positions preparing fruit (e.g. washing, hulling, or stemming), canning fruit, or labelling cans (a task often reserved for a small cadre of hired “girls”). Almost every plant that took part in the survey also lists among its staff a “Forewoman” or “Forelady,” who was tasked with managing the day-to-day work of female employees. Most Forewomen were paid a daily rate between $1.25 and $2.00. Notably, the “Forelady” at the Corvallis plant was paid $75 a month for her seasonal work (June 1 to November 1), the same as the Warehouseman and Receiving Clerk, and five dollars more than the Fireman.

Most women, however, could expect to be paid, on average, between ten and fifteen cents per hour. Three canneries – Eugene, Forest Grove, and Woodburn – specifically mention paying by the piece, in addition to hourly rates.

MSS Cannery_Forest Grove plant labor_Box 2 Folder 2

At the Forest Grove plant, hulling strawberries paid fifteen to twenty-five cents for each twenty-five-pound crate; canning strawberries paid one and a half cents per nineteen-can tray. Stemming cherries paid twelve to twelve and a half cents for each finished forty-five-pound box; canning cherries, however, only paid one cent per twelve-can tray. With the addition of piece rates, the Forest Grove cannery was the one surveyed location at which women could, theoretically, earn as much as men per hour (men were not offered per piece rates at the Forest Grove plant).

MSS Cannery_Forest Grove plant labor_Box 2 Folder 1

In contrast, the surveyed canneries hired, on average, between nine and fifteen men during the season, not including those hired for managerial or administrative positions. Men filled the managerial and administrative posts in cannery plants, working as plant Managers, Bookkeepers, Receiving Clerks, and “Processors.” These posts were typically salaried, and paid on a weekly or monthly basis; the full time Eugene plant manager was paid $166 per month for a year-round (the average was closer to $65 per month, or $2.50 per day). Men were also hired on as Engineers, Machinists, Firemen, and Warehousemen, and worked the can-capping machine, the conveyor belts, and the boilers. Men who worked these blue collar positions were paid hourly rates between twenty and twenty-five cents per hour; younger “boys,” who were sometimes hired as runners or helpers, were hired at an average rate of twelve cents an hour.

MSS Cannery_Eugene plant labels and Outline 9 and 10_Box 1 Folder 7_Page_3

Historically speaking, the division of labor likely made quite a bit of sense to contemporary plant managers. Women would have been the primary canners in most family units and therefore would have been the logical choice for preparing and canning produce. The fact that women could be hired at half the rate of pay as men would have further contributed to their desirability as employees. Yet, both the men hired as Engineers and Machinists, and the women hired as Preparers and Canners, were completing skilled tasks. The work would have been physically rigorous, and though none of the canneries reported the number of hours worked per day, the days would have likely been long, as a federally-mandated eight-hour work day was still several decades from being standard (the Fair Labor Standards Act wasn’t signed into law until 1937). Though not reflected in their pay, the intricate, skilled, and often physical work of women in canneries was as valuable as that of men.

Occasionally, surveys are accompanied by correspondence containing suggestions on operational efficiency and modernization from Certified Public Accountant, and survey Man-in-the-Field, J. W. Boies. For example, to the Benton County Growers’ Association in Corvallis, Boies suggested implementation of “simple, labor saving methods under a practical, but concise, cost system,” including the purchase of a “modern Cash Book, columnized Sales Book, [and] a modern Labor Saving method of distributing payroll.” All such prescriptive correspondence was also copied to the survey’s Auditing Committee, of which J. A. Bexell was also a member. It could be argued that these efforts toward the “modernization” and standardization of cannery operations would later allow the relief canneries operated during the Great Depression to operate more efficiently, thus better serving economically suffering families. Relief canneries distilled full-scale cannery operations down to their essence – boiler, capper, processers – and both the division of labor and ratio of labor that had worked best at the cannery plant is evidenced also at the relief canneries.

The USDA Northwest Cannery Survey Collection would support wide a range of research topics, including the marketing of Oregon agricultural products, history of women and labor, and Oregon industry, and would be complimented by a number of additional collections. The Experiment Station Communications Films and Horticulture Department Photographs contain images that document machinery and methods used in canning produce (e.g. strawberry capper-stemmers and field harvesters). Of special note are the images of soldiers acting as additional labor in canneries in both the Extension Bulletin Illustrations Photograph Collection and the Extension and Experiment Station Communications Photograph Collection. The Extension and Experiment Station Communications Photograph Collections also documents the use of Mexican migrant farm labor.  The Food Science and Technology Department Photographs additionally document relief cannery work done during the Great Depression.

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New finding aids for June!

Evelyn M. Raymond Photograph Album, circa 1920-1930

Evelyn M. Raymond Photograph Album, circa 1920-1930

We were busy in June! Here’s a list of the 10 new finding aids for SCARC collections that were finalized during June 2017.

Two of these guides are for components of the Gerald Williams Collection that were separated for description as discrete collections.

Four are for new collections received or created in 2015-2017; one of these is the large collection of aerial photographs of Benton County and 4 other nearby counties that have been transferred from the Libraries’ collections to SCARC. Three of these collections were previously not available to researchers. Three of the guides are for collections that previously had only preliminary or minimal descriptions available online. One is for a component of the University Publications (PUBS).

All of these materials are now available to researchers.

Components of the Gerald Williams Collection: 

Edward S. Curtis Photographs, 1900-1906 (P 333)

This collection consists of 3 photographic prints, acquired by Gerald W. Williams, that document aspects of Native American life between 1900 and 1926.  Curtis was known for his exceptional photography and his ethnological work that sought to document Native American groups and their cultures.

Gerald W. Williams Ephemera Collection, 1873-2008 (MSS WilliamsEphemera)

This collection consists of printed ephemera, documents, and objects assembled and acquired by Williams in the course of his work as a Forest Service sociologist and historian and due to his avocational interest in the history of forestry as a science and profession and the regional history of the Pacific Northwest.  Many of the materials in the collection were created or produced by the U.S. Forest Service.  Gerald Williams worked for the U.S. Forest Service from 1979 to 2005 as a sociologist (1979-1998) and historian (1998-2005).

 New collections received or created in 2015-2017:

Aerial Photographs of Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, and Polk Counties, 1936-1979 (P 321)

These aerial photographs were taken by or under contract with the United States Department of Agriculture from 1936 to 1979 and include images of 5 counties in western Oregon.  The collection includes photo mosaics, which serve as indices to the images, and predominintly large (~24×24 inches) photographs.  These images were previously part of the OSU Libraries maps collection and were transferred to SCARC in 2016, The collection includes 8100 items.

Irish American Newspaper Clippings Scrapbook, 1830-1874 (MSS IrishAmerican)

This scrapbook is comprised of poems, articles, and speeches pertaining to domestic topics, the Irish American immigrant experience, Irish sociopolitical issues, and the Catholic faith. The creator of the scrapbook is not known.  The scrapbook was acquired in 2015.

Evelyn M. Raymond Photograph Album, circa 1920-1930 (P 332)

This album consists of 167 photographs assembled by Raymond as an adolescent living in rural Douglas County, Oregon.  The images depict family members and friends; recreational activities and excursions; and local industries such as farming, ranching, logging, and quarrying.  The album was purchased in 2015.

World War II Scrapbooks, 1942-1945 (MSS WW2Scrapbooks)

These scrapbooks consist of newspaper clippings collection by an unknown compiler located in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  The collection is comprised of 13 scrapbooks with clippings spanning the period from September 1942 through September 1945.  The scrapbooks were acquired in 2016. 

University Publications (PUB):

 Science for Service, June 1926. From the Illustrated Booklets (PUB 488).

Science for Service, June 1926. From the Illustrated Booklets (PUB 488).

Illustrated Booklets, 1911-1930 (PUB 488)

These booklets were published by Oregon Agricultural College during the 1910s and 1920s to promote and publicize the College to potential students and Oregon residents.  The booklets include numerous photographs of the campus in Corvallis as well as students in laboratories and classrooms and participating in student activities.  This collection consists of 29 booklets, all of which are available online and searchable in Oregon Digital.

Collections that were previously described only minimally:   

Brewing and Fermentation Research Collection, 1891-2016 (MSS BFRC)

This artificial collection consists of materials documenting the history, growth, and culture of the Pacific Northwest brewing industry, including regional hops and barley farming, commercial craft and home brewing, and craft cider and mead.  This collection was originally established in 2014 as the Oregon Hops and Brewing Collection and was renamed in 2017 as part of the preparation of this guide.   The collection includes 2.7 Gbytes of born-digital materials.

Viola Gentle Papers, 1954-1959 (MSS Gentle)

This small collection is comprised of materials relating to Gentle’s experience as a survivor of the collection off the coast of Nantucket between the S.S. Andrea Doria (Italian Line) and the M.S. Stockholm (Swedish American Line) on July 25, 1956.  In addition to Gentle’s correspondence with the Captain of the Andrea Doria and fellow survivors, travel documentation, and newspaper clippings detailing the rescue efforts, the collection includes 1 photograph and an audiotape recording of an interview with Gentle.

USDA Northwest Cannery Survey Collection, 1914-1915 (MSS Cannery)

These materials pertain to a 1914 survey of fruit canneries in Oregon and Washington.  The survey was conducted by the USDA Office of Markets and Rural Organization in cooperation with Oregon Agricultural College.

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New series on the Pauling Blog ~ serological properties of simple substances

Linus Pauling, 1942

Linus Pauling, 1942

Check out the first three posts in a series investigating Pauling’s work on the serological properties of simple substances on the Pauling Blog!

Part one looks at The Serological Properties of Simple Substances

Part two looks at Analyzing Precipitation Reactions Between Simple Substances

Part three looks at A Period of Rapid Advancement in Pauling’s Immunological Work

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What’s been going on in SCARC this month? A lot

Those who watch our events calendar or follow us on Facebook know that there’s been a lot going on for us this spring. Play readings, campus tours, public talks, sunshine, lots of classes. It’s been fun and busy!

Pride Week 2017 saw an April 25 panel discussion at the Native American Longhouse Eena Haws called “Consent is A-sexy and Required: Healthy Relationships with Asexual and Aromantic People.”

The OMA was also featured in the OLA Quarterly in an article called “Las Historias de Latinos en Oregón: Canby, Oregón An Oral History Project Collaboration Between A Librarian and an Archivist.”

There are two blog posts on The Pauling Blog about Pauling’s relationship working with Daisaku Ikeda, a resident of Tokyo and the son of a seaweed farmer, witnessed first-hand the devastation that two nuclear bombs wrought upon his homeland.

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Great news! All of the color slides and transparencies that were scanned and described from the Beaver Yearbook photos are now live. There are about 225 total, all from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s.

Here are some of my favorites!

This front loader was clearing snow on Monroe Street in 1969. P003:1711

This front loader was clearing snow on Monroe Street in 1969. P003:1711

Dick Fosbury attended OSU from 1965-1969 and is remembered today as the inventor of the "Fosbury Flop" high jump technique. He won two national championships and an Olympic gold medal while revolutionizing the sport with his innovative approach to jumping higher. P003:2707

Dick Fosbury attended OSU from 1965-1969 and is remembered today as the inventor of the “Fosbury Flop” high jump technique. He won two national championships and an Olympic gold medal while revolutionizing the sport with his innovative approach to jumping higher. P003:2707

The Hall of Flags on the main concourse of the Memorial Union. P003:2474

The Hall of Flags on the main concourse of the Memorial Union. P003:2474

These dryers were likely part of the Seavey hops yards in the south part of Corvallis. P003:1757

These dryers were likely part of the Seavey hops yards in the south part of Corvallis. P003:1757

Student making a lithograph in a printmaking course. Art and several other social sciences and humanities subjects were approved as majors in 1966. P003:2952

Student making a lithograph in a printmaking course. Art and several other social sciences and humanities subjects were approved as majors in 1966. P003:2952

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On the Road with Finley and Bohlman

Motoring across Alkali Flats, 1912. Org. Lot 369, Finley B0160.

Motoring across Alkali Flats, 1912. Org. Lot 369, Finley B0160.

Our year of working on the Reuniting Finley and Bohlman project is reaching its conclusion and to celebrate, we are taking our show on the road. Starting in two weeks, OHS staff are headed out east to share some of our favorite finds from the collections. Complete program details available at www.ohs.org/finley.

We hope that we will see you there!

On the Road with Finley and Bohlman
program tour schedule:

William L. Finley photographing beside his car near Island Ranch, Harney County, Oregon, 1919. Org. Lot 369, Finley D1991.

William L. Finley photographing beside his car near Island Ranch, Harney County, Oregon, 1919. Org. Lot 369, Finley D1991.

Burns
Presented by Laura Cray

Free and open to the public
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
6:30PM – 8PM

Harney County Library
80 West D Street
Burns, Oregon 97720

 

Finding Finley and Bohlman’s Wildlife Muses – A Malheur Refuge Outing

Follow in Finley and Bohlman’s footsteps Wednesday, April 26th on a self-guided tour of some of Harney County’s best birding hotspots. Guide maps will be handed out at the event Tuesday night and the Malheur Refuge Headquarters will be staffed with volunteers and refuge employees to answer questions from 8:00am to 4:00pm.


William L. Finley seated in front of an umbrella blind taking notes on the 1905 Klamath expedition with several small birds perched around his legs. Org. Lot 369, Finley A1600.

William L. Finley seated in front of an umbrella blind taking notes on the 1905 Klamath expedition with several small birds perched around his legs. Org. Lot 369, Finley A1600.

Klamath Falls
Presented by Laura Cray

Free and open to the public
Thursday, April 27, 2017
7PM – 8PM

Oregon Institute of Technology, College Union Auditorium
3201 Campus Drive
Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601

 

 

Finding Finley and Bohlman’s Wildlife Muses – A Lower Klamath Refuge Outing

Follow in Finley and Bohlman’s footsteps Friday, April 28th on a self-guided tour of some of the Klamath Basin’s best birding hotspots. Guide maps will be handed out at the event Tuesday night and the Refuge Headquarters at Tule Lake will be staffed with refuge employees to answer questions from 9:00am to 4:00pm.


Ellis Hadley (First in line), William L. Finley (center), and Herman Bohlman (last) wading pantsless through water to photograph a red-tailed hawk’s in 1902 near Portland, OR. Org. Lot 369, Finley A2652.

Ellis Hadley (First in line), William L. Finley (center), and Herman Bohlman (last) wading pantsless through water to photograph a red-tailed hawk’s in 1902 near Portland, OR. Org. Lot 369, Finley A2652.

Corvallis
Presented by Laura Cray and
Bob Sallinger

Free and open to the public
Saturday, May 13, 2017
6PM – 7:30PM

Willamette Room – Oregon State University Library
121 The Valley Library
Corvallis, Oregon 97331

 

Finding Finley and Bohlman’s Wildlife Muses – A Finley Refuge Outing

The William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge was named for the famous conservationist and photographer of the same name. Join USFWS staff and volunteers on an evening discovery outing while looking for the very species Finley and Bohlman captured and described in their photographs, writings and talks. We’ll finish just in time for you to enjoy a picnic meal out at the Tyee Winery bonfire event that night, just down the road. And the walk will set the stage for the Saturday evening event discussing the fascinating history and legacy of William L. Finley and Herman Bohlman – conservation leaders without whom we might not have this special wildlife refuge right out our backdoor.


Herman T. Bohlman and William L. Finley climbing up a the face of Shag Rock to photograph murres in 1903 at Three Arch Rocks, OR. Org. Lot 369, Finley A2520.

Herman T. Bohlman and William L. Finley climbing up a the face of Shag Rock to photograph murres in 1903 at Three Arch Rocks, OR. Org. Lot 369, Finley A2520.

Oceanside
Presented by Laura Cray and Bob Sallinger

Free and open to the public
Sunday, May 14, 2017
2PM – 3:30PM

Netarts Community Club
4949 Hwy SR131
Netarts, Oregon 97143

Finding Finley and Bohlman’s Wildlife Muses – A Three Arch Outing

May 14, 2017 3:30pm – 4:30pm

Cape Meares Scenic Viewpoint

Immediately following the main program, Join USFWS staff and volunteers on a discovery outing while looking for the very species Finley and Bohlman captured and described in their photographs, writings and talks. From the Cape Meares Scenic Viewpoint, visitors will be able to enjoy views of Three Arch Rocks and to learn about the seabirds protected at the refuge.


Herman T. Bohlman and A. W. Anthony photographing kingfishers in 1902 near Portland, OR. Org. Lot 369, Finley A2723.

Herman T. Bohlman and A. W. Anthony photographing kingfishers in 1902 near Portland, OR. Org. Lot 369, Finley A2723.

Portland
Presented by Laura Cray with guest panelists Bob Sallinger, Tom McAllister, and Worth Mathewson

Free and open to the public
Wednesday, June 7, 2017
6:30PM – 7:30PM

Oregon Historical Society
1200 SW Park Ave
Portland, Oregon 97205


Learn More

To see more, be sure to check up on the Reuniting Finley and Bohlman Collection on Oregon Digital throughout the year as additional materials are uploaded.

This blog series is part of a yearlong partnership between the Oregon Historical Society Research Library and Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections and Archives to digitize the Finley and Bohlman photograph and manuscript collections held by our libraries and to unite them online through Oregon Digital and the OHS Digital Collections website. Stay tuned in coming months for future installments about Finley, Bohlman, and their birding adventures around the state.

This project is supported in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the Oregon State Library.

Institute of Museum and Library Services LogoOregon Historical Society LogoOregon State University Logo

 

 

 

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What’s new on the Brewstorian blog? Four new posts just in time for your weekend!

There’s been a flurry of activity on the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives’ blog.

OHBA student worker Gillian wrote a thoughtful piece on doing research on women in the brewing industries, specifically in how tough it was for her to find meaningful statistics when I asked her to find some.

I spent most of this week in Washington, doing oral history interviews with Sybil Perkins and Robyn Schumacher in Seattle, and Ralph Woodall and Tom Carpenter in Yakima. I had a bit of time to kill between a meeting with Ralph Olson and Ann George, so I went in search of America’s First Brewpub.

Ivy Lin’s “Bitter Harvest” short documentary film is debuting May 3rd at 7:00PM at the Kennedy School in Portland. It is part of Oregon Humanities “This Land / Your Land, My Land” exhibit exploring land ownership issues in minority communities in Oregon, and her piece focuses on Chinese immigrants growing hops in the Willamette Valley from 1890-1930. There will be a panel discussion after the film and I’ll be talking about historical research and saving these stories.

Finally, Deschutes Brewery is hiring a summer intern to process and organize their company records. It’s a pretty awesome opportunity.

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Food History Intern: discovering fermentables!

Edel Brau "It's the beer" 1907

Edel Brau “It’s the beer” 1907

The topic of fermentation is an interesting one, and there was a surprising amount of information about it here in the Valley Library. After a day or two of struggling of what to look up, it dawned on me to figure out what kinds of food can be fermented. I had always known about pickled eggs, sauerkraut, vinegar, etc., but it just never clicked in my head that “hey, those are fermented!”

Once I had the stroke of genius, it was easier to find information, and boy is there information about fermentation. Unsurprisingly, there’s a bit of information regarding fermentation in Food Microbiology, as well as a lot of overlap in terms of sources for the fermented food items. There’s also a lot of information about wine, beer, and cider. Mead was a difficult one that kept bringing up different people with the name Mead.

To help make searching for these things easier, I also made up a map of the general locations that have information on each of these fermentation topics and gave ideas of their call numbers.

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Fabulous new posts on the Oregon Multicultural Archives blog!

Fabulous new posts on the Oregon Multicultural Archives blog including some fabulous events, celebrations, and scanning projects!

Screen Shot 2017-03-16 at 4.05.00 PM

Check them all out on the OMA blog. 

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