Project Intern Position Available!

Ellis Hadley (left) William Finley (center) and Herman Bohlman wading across a river on their way to a red-tailed hawks' nest, circa 1900.

Ellis Hadley (left) William Finley (center) and Herman Bohlman wading across a river on their way to a red-tailed hawks’ nest, circa 1900.

Oregon State University’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center is participating in a LSTA grant project to digitize the papers and photographs of naturalists William F. Finley, Herman T. Bohlman, and Irene Barnhart Finley.  The intern will assist with various aspects of the project:

• enter metadata used to access the digitized manuscript files based on a data dictionary created by the Center for Digital Scholarship and Services in conjunction with Special Collections and Archives Research Center.

• ingest that content into Oregon Digital

• refolder or take other steps to preserve the original materials appropriately

• write a post about the project for the Special Collections & Archives Research Center’s “Speaking of History” blog.

Required Qualifications: Course work or experience with applying metadata to archival collections

Preferred Qualifications: Undergraduate degree in a related field

The intern will work an average of 12 hours a week, or 312 hours total, over a six month period of the project.  Work hours will be scheduled Monday – Friday between 8 a.m. to 5 pm. at OSU’s Valley Library. Will require working on site in Corvallis, Oregon.

Hourly wage: $12.50 per hour.

Apply by January 24, 2017. For application and full position description see: http://jobs.oregonstate.edu/postings/36212

 

Posted in Main Page | Leave a comment

Announcing the 4th Annual OSU Book Collecting Contest!

The OSU Valley Library is proud to announce the fourth year of our sponsored Book Collecting Contest!

Generously sponsored by the Himes & Duniway Society, a group of book collecting enthusiasts in Oregon, this contest is intended:

  • to encourage students in the collection and enjoyment of their own personal libraries,
  • to aid students in developing an appreciation for the special qualities of printed or illustrated works, and
  • to encourage students to read, research, and preserve these works for pleasure and scholarship.

The collection can focus on any subject, and the contest is open to all full-time students.

Prizes:

Three prizes will be awarded to student winners:

1st prize: $1,000
2nd prize: $500
3rd prize: $250

Prizes are generously funded by the Himes & Duniway Society.

APPLICATIONS ARE DUE Friday, March 10, 2017 by 5:00 PM.

How Do I Enter?
The Application Package should include the following:

  • The application form;
  • The essay, which should be at least two and no more than four pages in 12-point type with lines double-spaced describing how and why the collection was assembled;
  • bibliography of the collection preferably using the MLA Bibliography format with each individual title numbered and annotated. The annotations should reflect the importance of each item to the collection as a whole
  • An annotated wish list of up to five other book titles that you would like to add in the future to complete or enhance your existing collection; and
  • digital images of at least 5 representative items in the collection, with 10 or more images being preferable.

You can submit your application in one of two ways:

1. Email your application package to Anne Bahde at anne.bahde@oregonstate.edu

2. Drop off your application package to the Special Collections and Archives Research Center, 5th floor of Valley Library.

What’s a “Collection?
A collection

  • Consists of items that a student has come to own following a particular interest, or passion, which may be academic or not
  • May consist of all books or a combination of books and other formats. For instance, a collection on a geographical topic may include a map, a collection on a playwright may include a poster or playbill, or a collection about an historical event may include ephemera.
  • Consists of not less than 15 items or more than 30 items of which the majorityshould be books, but related materials such as photographs, illustrations, maps, ephemera, CDs, music scores, posters etc. may be included.
  • Can be on any topic; subjects can be contemporary or historical and may stress bibliographical features such as bindings, printing processes, type, editions, illustrations, etc. Rare books are not expected. Comic books and graphic novels are acceptable; ephemera alone if of historical interest is acceptable; historical–not current–textbooks may be included.

Examples of Previous Winners (2016)

  • Marie Bello, Fisheries and Wildlife: “Drawn to Inquiry: Scientific Illustration and Field Sketching as a Method of Exploring the Natural World
  • 2nd prize: Kelsey Cronin, Biology: “Maps, Trails, and Navigation”
  • 3rd prize: Victoria Drexel, MFA Program in Creative Writing: “Under My Skin: Collecting Sinatra”

How Do I Win?
Criteria for selection:

  • Clearly state the purpose or unified theme of the collection;
  • Explain the extent to which the collection represents the stated purpose;
  • Evidence of creativity in building the collection;
  • Originality, innovation, and uniqueness;
  • Quality of the collector’s essay describing the collection

A team of judges from campus and The Himes & Duniway Society will determine the contest winners.

The Fine Print:

Students are limited to one entry. The student must be a full time student and the sole owner of the collection. The winners may be eligible for entry into The National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest supported by the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America (ABAA), the Fellowship of American Bibliophilic Societies (FABS) of which The Himes & Duniway Society is a member, the Center for the Book and the Rare Books and Special Collections Division (the Library of Congress) with major support from the Jay I. Kislak Foundation. http://hq.abaa.org/books/antiquarian/abaapages/contest

If you have questions about book collecting or this contest, contact Anne Bahde at anne.bahde@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-2083.

Posted in Main Page | Leave a comment

William Finley and the great elk transplant of 1912

An unidentified man sitting buried up to his neck in a field of heavy snow. Idaho, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0521.

An unidentified man sitting buried up to his neck in a field of heavy snow. Idaho, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0521.

With Oregon draped in a heavy blanket of snow last week and the holiday season in full swing, I cannot help but call to mind the sound of hoof prints in the snow and William Finley’s great elk transplant of 1912 for this month’s installment of the Reuniting Finley and Bohlman series.

Clipping from the February 12, 1912 Morning Oregonian detailing the concerns from members of the Wallowa County Wool Growers about the planned transplant of elk to the region. Full text of the article available at: ohttp://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83025138/1912-02-12/ed-1/seq-7/

Clipping from the February 12, 1912 Morning Oregonian detailing the concerns from members of the Wallowa County Wool Growers about the planned transplant of elk to the region. Full text of the article available at: http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/ sn83025138/1912-02-12/ed-1/seq-7/

While Finely is better known for his wildlife photography and role in the conservation movement, he also played a key role in Oregon’s early wildlife management. In 1911, Governor Oswald West hired Finely to help form Oregon’s first Fish and Game Commission. West formally appointed Finley as the state’s game warden to oversee the Commission later that year.

As head of the Commission, Finley hired a team of forty game wardens to work under him across the state. He established and, for the early years wrote most of the content for, Oregon Sportsman. He also pushed for stricter limits and regulations on hunting and fishing in the state to protect and restore rapidly depleting wild populations.

One of Finley’s first and most prominent projects as game warden was to address the state’s declining elk population. Overhunting and diminishing habitat reduced the once plentiful elk herds to a few scattered bands in remote mountainous sections of the state. The Biological Survey of the Department of Agriculture donated a herd of 15 wild elk from the Jackson Hole region in Wyoming to be sent to Oregon. Some in the community, particularly members of the Wool Growers Association, protested the loss of grazing lands at Billy Meadows in Wallowa County to make room for the new elk.

Feature in the April 26, 1914 edition of the Sunday Oregonian about Finley's efforts to restore wildlife populations around the state. Full text available at: http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/ sn83045782/1914-04-26/ed-1/seq-80/

Feature in the April 26, 1914 edition of the Sunday Oregonian about Finley’s efforts to restore wildlife populations around the state. Full text available at: http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/ sn83045782/1914-04-26/ed-1/seq-80/

Most in the state, however, watched the process with great interest. To pay for the journey Elks Lodge members raised $351 and the residents of Wallow County raised the final $181.25.[1]

In early March 1912, the elk were loaded into specially built sleighs and the team set out on an arduous two-week journey from Wyoming to the Wallowa Mountains. Newspapers covered the herd’s progress as they moved westward by sleigh, wagon, and train. As they traveled through towns along the route, crowds came out to catch glimpses of the elk. After their release in Billy Meadows communities throughout the state continued to follow the elk, with newspapers giving regular accounts of births, deaths, and other goings on within the heard. By 1917, the Billy Meadows heard had increased enough to send small bands of elk to repopulate regions throughout the state.

Horses pulling large crates full of elk on sled runners in the snow near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0402.

Horses pulling large crates full of elk on sled runners in the snow near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0402.

An elk waiting in a corral in Saint Anthony, Idaho, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0415.

An elk waiting in a corral in Saint Anthony, Idaho, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0415.

Three men standing at the door of a boxcar used to transport elk from Saint Anthony, Idaho to Joseph, Oregon, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0408.

Three men standing at the door of a boxcar used to transport elk from Saint Anthony, Idaho to Joseph, Oregon, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0408.

A man holding his hand out to pet a calf elk in a corral in Saint Anthony, Idaho, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0424.

A man holding his hand out to pet a calf elk in a corral in Saint Anthony, Idaho, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0424.

A large crowd gathered to view elk loaded in a boxcar on their trip from Saint Anthony, Idaho to Joseph, Oregon, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0433.

A large crowd gathered to view elk loaded in a boxcar on their trip from Saint Anthony, Idaho to Joseph, Oregon, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0433.

A train of wagons hauling elk crates through heavy snow up to Billy Meadows in the Wallowa Mountains, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0457.

A train of wagons hauling elk crates through heavy snow up to Billy Meadows in the Wallowa Mountains, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0457.

A group of unidentified men working to lift an elk crate from the wagon base with a pulley to transfer to sled runners after snow became too deep to continue with the wagons. Wallowa Mountains, Oregon, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0484.

A group of unidentified men working to lift an elk crate from the wagon base with a pulley to transfer to sled runners after snow became too deep to continue with the wagons. Wallowa Mountains, Oregon, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0484.

A group of men lowering an elk crate onto skids after the snow became too deep to traverse by wagon. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0486.

A group of men lowering an elk crate onto skids after the snow became too deep to traverse by wagon.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0486.

A group of men lowering an elk crate onto skids after the snow became too deep to traverse by wagon. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0488.

A group of men lowering an elk crate onto skids after the snow became too deep to traverse by wagon.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0488.

A man balancing atop a "go-devil" makeshift sled hauling elk crates through the heavy snow. Wallowa Mountains, Oregon, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0489.

A man balancing atop a “go-devil” makeshift sled hauling elk crates through the heavy snow. Wallowa Mountains, Oregon, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0489.

Men standing by a fence watching elk as they are unloaded from crates into a holding corral at Billy Meadows. Wallowa Mountains, Oregon, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0506.

Men standing by a fence watching elk as they are unloaded from crates into a holding corral at Billy Meadows. Wallowa Mountains, Oregon, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0506.

A herd of elk standing in the snow at Billy Meadows after being released at the end of their journey from Wyoming. Wallowa Mountains, Oregon, 1912. OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0510.

A herd of elk standing in the snow at Billy Meadows after being released at the end of their journey from Wyoming. Wallowa Mountains, Oregon, 1912.
OHS Research Library, Org. Lot 369, Finley B0510.

Learn More

To see more, be sure to check up on the Reuniting Finley and Bohlman Collection on Oregon Digital throughout the year as additional materials are uploaded.

This blog series is part of a yearlong partnership between the Oregon Historical Society Research Library and Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections and Archives to digitize the Finley and Bohlman photograph and manuscript collections held by our libraries and to unite them online through Oregon Digital and the OHS Digital Collections website. Stay tuned in coming months for future installments about Finley, Bohlman, and their birding adventures around the state.

This project is supported in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the Oregon State Library.

Institute of Museum and Library Services Logo

Oregon Historical Society Logo

Oregon State University Logo

 

 

 

[1] Finley, W. L. (1912). Game and fish protection and propagation in Oregon, 1911, 1912. Portland: Boyer Printing Co..

Posted in Finley, Main Page | Leave a comment

What’s new on the Pauling Blog? Sharpening Rhetoric, Sad Conclusions

Flyer for a joint Chomsky-Pauling presentation, Montreal, 1967

Flyer for a joint Chomsky-Pauling presentation, Montreal, 1967

 

As the 1960s moved forward, Linus Pauling’s interest in contributing to an academic circle that resolutely rejected the Vietnam War continued to strengthen. A participant in several past petitions, Pauling co-authored another such document in June 1967, a “Scientists’ Appeal for Vietnam,” signed by a collection of scientific all stars including Nobel laureates Pauling, Lord John Boyd Orr, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Alfred Kastler, André Michel Lwoff, C.F. Powell, Bertrand Russell, R.L.M. Synge, and Albert Szent-Györgyi. Additional signatories included Pauling’s close friend J.D. Bernal, an influential x-ray crystallographer and peace activist; neurologist and president of the Association of Scientific Workers Harry Grundfest; Soviet biochemist Alexander Oparin; and an Indian scientist and activist, S. Hussain Zaheer.

Read the rest of part 6 in the Pauling and the Vietnam War series on the Pauling Blog.

Posted in Main Page | Leave a comment

New collections guides for November

Three new finding aids for SCARC collections were finished last month!

Two are guides for components of the former Gerald W. Williams Collection that have been separated from the core collection and described with a finding aid. The other is for a collection that was previously only minimally described with a preliminary collection-level description and container and now has a full detailed finding aid.

As of November 30, 2016, the OSU Special Collections and Archives Research Center has 864 finding aids in Archives West.

Gerald W. Williams Family Vacation Slides, 1973-1991 (P 316)

Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, 1954

Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, 1954

These slides consist of images taken by Williams documenting trips and activities by Williams and his family in Oregon, Washington, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana. The collection includes 703 color slides.

Gerald W. Williams Glass Negatives Collection, circa 1910 (P 326)

Cliffs on Beach, Salmon River Bay, c. 1910

Cliffs on Beach, Salmon River Bay, c. 1910

This collection consists of 8 glass negatives of the central Oregon coast assembled and acquired by Williams due to his avocational interest in the history of the Pacific Northwest region. The photographer is not identified.

Elvin A. Duerst Papers, 1929-1999 (MSS Duerst)

Elvin A. Duerst.

The Duerst Papers are comprised of materials relating to Duerst’s education and career as an international agricultural economist. The collection documents his time as a student at Linfield College, Oregon State College, and the University of Illinois and his professional work in agricultural transportation and infrastructure projects, economic development planning, and foreign aid coordination. The collection includes more than 2500 photographs and 116 maps.

Posted in Main Page | Leave a comment

What’s new on the Brewstorian blog? Two new posts on the Montana Brewery Oral History Project

Kessler Brewery touted the health benefits of its beers, claiming you’d notice its health benefits in the glow of health on your cheek. Helena Independent, June 29, 1900

Kessler Brewery touted the health benefits of its beers, claiming you’d notice its health benefits in the glow of health on your cheek. Helena Independent, June 29, 1900

The Montana Historical Society Research Center received a $4,500 grant from Humanities Montana to conduct oral history interviews that will capture the history of modern craft brewing and breweries in Montana.

In a separate follow up post is an interview with Anneliese Warhank, director of the project

Posted in Main Page | Leave a comment

What’s new on the OMA blog? ES 351 Fall Term 2016 Class Poster Session

ethnic-studiesThis fall term the OMA hosted the students of Professor Daniel López-Cevallos’ ethnic studies course ES 351 “Ethnic Minorities in Oregon” for a session on the collections and histories available for them to use as part of their class projects. At the end of the term, the students returned to the archives to give poster presentations about their research. The students’ topics of study included: the IRCO Asian Family Center, Chinese Disinterment in Oregon, Mexican Immigration in Oregon, the Oregon – and OSU – Japanese Exclusion and Executive Order 9066, the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and Chinese Miners in Oregon.

Read the whole post here. 

Posted in Main Page | Leave a comment

Two new posts on the Brewstorian blog about Peter Kopp’s Collections at the Center talk!

Screen Shot 2016-11-30 at 4.22.55 PMThe Friday before Thanksgiving we hosted historian Peter Kopp for a Collections at the Center talk, which gave him an opportunity to talk about his new book (Hoptopia) and research process, and gave us an excuse to show fabulous archival documents.

All sorts of people were in the audience, from archivists to local hop farmers, brewers and even the famous hopmeister Dr. Alfred Haunold himself.

Read and see more on the Brewstorian Blog!

That time when Peter Kopp gave a talk OSU – and Al Haunold helped him out.

Had a wonderful time hosting Peter Kopp to promote his new book on hop history, Hoptopia

Posted in Main Page | Leave a comment

What’s new on the Pauling Blog? Launching an Offensive Against the War

quicksand

“If President Johnson had to kill – shoot, burn to death – ten Vietnamese women and children every morning before breakfast, the war would soon end.” -Linus Pauling, 1967

By early 1965, convinced that the United States government was the primary obstacle to initiating a cease-fire and subsequent negotiations in Vietnam, Linus Pauling increasingly began to go on the offensive against the war.

Read the entire post on the Pauling Blog. 

This is part 5 of 7 on Pauling and the Vietnam War.

Posted in Main Page | Leave a comment

What’s new on the Pauling Blog? Struggling to Find Common Ground

George W. Ball and President Lyndon Johnson, ca. 1965. Image credit: George W. Ball Papers, Princeton University.

George W. Ball and President Lyndon Johnson, ca. 1965. Image credit: George W. Ball Papers, Princeton University.

Almost as soon as he had received it, Linus Pauling sent a copy of Ho Chi Minh’s letter of November 17, 1965 to U.S. President Lyndon Johnson. While the letter contained some “strongly worded” rhetoric about the United States, Pauling wrote, these were to be expected from the leader of a small country that was undergoing significant aerial bombardment from a world power.

In Pauling’s view, the more loaded statements made in the letter were relatively unimportant. Rather, Pauling highlighted Ho Chi Minh’s aspirations for peace as the crux of his response, pointing out that his four-point prescription for resolution was not described as a prerequisite for the initiation of negotiations. Indeed, Pauling took pains to note (perhaps with some measure of concern) that Minh had not called for negotiations as a means to achieve a peaceful resolution at all. Nonetheless, he believed that the Vietnamese leader’s hopes for peace in his country could prevail if the United States initiated negotiations for strategic withdrawal and cease-fire.

Read Part 4 of 7 in the series Pauling and the Vietnam War on the Pauling Blog.

Posted in Main Page | Leave a comment